I Tried Selena Gomez’s "Burrito" Sweat Bed, and Didn't Wear Foundation for Days

Faith Xue
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Things that go with Netflix: wine, sweatpants, chilling, and…sweating?  Shape House, a self-decreed “urban sweat lodge,” just opened its fourth location in Los Angeles (if you're planning a trip to the US soon, you're in luck!), and describing it out loud makes it sound like the most L.A. thing, ever: for $45, you can be wrapped up in an infrared-heated blanket burrito-style, and proceed to sweat away toxins, pounds, and last night’s bad decisions. Oh, and did I mention that every sweat bed is equipped with a TV featuring all of Netflix’s vast offerings? Like I said: the most L.A.-sounding thing ever—except for the fact that there have been numerous studies published on the detoxifying, health benefits of sweating and sweat lodges have been used for hundreds of years through different cultures for reasons both physical and spiritual. In fact, it was an experience at one of these traditional sweat lodges that inspired French founder Sophie Chiche to create Shape House. “My very first exposure to sweating was in a traditional healing lodge, which I was assigned to cover when I was working as a journalist for a French magazine,” she tells me via email. “Later, I found myself sweating in a more modern way as part of a weight-loss routine that encompassed everything under the sun. What these vastly different experiences showed me was that sweating can represent a multitude of things to different people, with different needs. It's a way to relax, rejuvenate, and repair your body and mind from the inside-out, and there's really no wrong way to approach that sort of process.” 

Anyone who’s emerged from a pump classs drenched in sweat and feeling like a butterfly emerging from a (dimly lit, EDM-filled) cocoon can attest to the truth of that statement: sweating makes you feel good. Unfortunately, I am not one of those people who sweats buckets while working out (ok fine, I’m not one of those people who works out). Thus, I was eager to try out Shape House, which promises me all the benefits of an exercise class—800 to 1,600 calories burned—without the exercising. Being the dubious and semi-jaded beauty editor that I am, I was suspicious. It seemed too good to be true. But Selena Gomez swears by it (she told Elle.com: “It's changed my skin, it's kind of changed my body as well, so it feels really good”) and she seems like a happy, healthy human being with good skin so it couldn’t possibly be all that bad, right? Keep scrolling to read about my experience with the “burrito sweat bed” Selena Gomez loves.

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