Nov 17, 2017 Diet

4 Detox Water Recipes That Will Give You a Flatter Stomach

by Lindsey Metrus

When used in the context of your diet, the words cleanse" and detox are quite controversial. This is mostly because some commercial cleanses and "detox" products on the market are full of sugar and empty calories, thus essentially causing more harm than good. Similarly, your liver and kidneys are natural detoxifiers, so drinking and eating foods that claim to do the work of your body's internal organs seems redundant and like a waste of time and money.

While these items may be true, toxins can be looked at through a few different lenses. Dr. Frank Lipman, founder and director of the Eleven Eleven Wellness Center in New York City, tells The Cut that anything in the wrong dose can be toxic to the body. Toxins manifest themselves in the form of pollutants, chemicals, and even foods like gluten and lactose, for those who are allergic or averse to them. So while we may not have a high content of poisonous, harmful toxins floating around our bodies (trust us— you would know and should see a physician stat, if so), there are components that don't sit well with our bodies. These can stand to be eliminated from our diets as well prompted to be flushed out of our systems by drinking plenty of water.

That's where detox water—or infused water—comes in. No, not sugary juices you'll pay a cool $9 for, but fruit-, vegetable-, and herb-infused waters that may not completely rid your system of all evil but will kick-start your metabolism, support your liver, and deliver nutrients in a natural, unharmful way. Many are also packed with natural antioxidants to reverse cell damage. Plus, the influx of water and many of the anti-inflammatory ingredients will help de-bloat—a miracle component if we've ever heard one. Take a look at some of the best detox water recipes below!

PHOTO:

Wanderlust Drifted

Recipe courtesy of Nichola Whitehead, RD

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cucumber
  • 1 lemon
  • A few sprigs of mint
  • Water

Directions:

  1. Wash and slice the cucumber and lemon, and rinse the mint.
  2. Place cucumber and lemon into a water jug.
  3. Fill the jug with water, mix, and leave to steep overnight in the fridge. You can keep topping off the jug with more water for a few days until you need to change the fruits/herbs.

What does it do?

Nutritionist Meryl Pritchard of Kore Kitchen says that lemons help to kick-start digestion while flushing out toxins. The vitamin C will also brighten up your skin.

PHOTO:

Feast + West

Recipe courtesy of Dr. Edward Group DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

Ingredients:

  • 10 fresh, whole strawberries
  • 2 lemon wedges
  • Freshly squeezed juice from 1/2 lemon
  • Handful of fresh basil leaves

Directions:

Start with one gallon of purified water (room temperature is fine). Combine the other ingredients in a glass container, stir gently with a wooden spoon, and refrigerate for 3 to 4 hours to allow all ingredients to mingle. Serve and enjoy.

What does it do?

Strawberries are high in antioxidants, potassium, vitamin C, and many other nutrients, according to Group. Basil has anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties.

PHOTO:

Kitchen Confidante

Recipe courtesy of Edward Group

Ingredients:

  • 1 cucumber, thinly sliced
  • 2 inches fresh, peeled ginger root
  • 2 lemon/lime wedges
  • 10 to 12 fresh mint leaves
  • Pinch of Himalayan salt
  • Bonus: a dash of peppermint essential oil

Directions:

Same as above.

What does it do?

Ginger can be used to ameliorate a variety of ailments like an upset stomach and a sore throat because of its anti-inflammatory properties, according to Group.

Recipe courtesy of Eat This, Not That

Ingredients:

  • Cubed pineapple and mango (enough to fill 1/3 of a glass)
  • A few lemon slices
  • Water

Directions:

Combine all ingredients, and serve.

What does it do?

Pineapple is chock-full of bromelain, an anti-inflammatory enzyme. Mangoes help improve digestion to help de-bloat flatten your tummy as well.